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  • Featured Image Immediately make your bike cooler with these items!

    I will be moving forward and moving fast with the shop this year. Starting day one of 2015 I will taking the shop further than its ever been. The goal is to make this a full time venture. I will offer custom handmade goods of all kinds and in a wide range of disciplines. Custom painted helmets, hand engraved parts, leather goods and even full motorcycle builds! You can get everything for your custom bike done by me and to your specifications and best of all, its all done in one place! No outsourcing custom seats, engraved parts, powder-coated parts, motorcycle builds or modifications and get a helmet, wallet and holster to go with it!

    So, with that, I’m going to show some of the stuff from 2014 that I have not got around to yet. Then, we move on from there to the new year!

    Any of these items can be used as inspiration to create your own item of choice. You can ride around with a custom, one of a kind piece of hand-made art! The sky really is the limit. Have an idea? Submit it to me and we will make it happen together. Contact me at juggernautsgarage@gmail.com

    Peace, grease and a life of ease,

    ~Juggernaut



  • Featured Image Helping families of HEROES!

    Stuff if getting a bit crazy out there for those who spend their days protecting us! Juggernaut Cycles is going to give a little something back and we need your help!

    Blue lives matter! Juggernaut cycles is a Law Enforcement Officer owned motorcycle shop that would like to get your help in showing support to our brothers and sisters in BLUE! In this dire time, many more officers’ lives have been put in greater danger. Yet, faithfully we still arrive at work ready to get the job done. Very few are standing up for the heroes Law Enforcement right now but, let’s show what we few can do!

    derby plain

    Donate here~ http://www.gofundme.com/jc05nc

    Juggernaut Cycles has created this one of a kind, hand engraved Harley-Davidson style derby cover. This cover displays the Patron Saint of Law Enforcement, St. Michael and the “Thin Blue Line”. The “St. Michael Protect Us” Derby Cover is a custom motorcycle part that will set your ride apart from any other while showing support to those in Blue.  Everyone will know where you stand when you ride in!

    Here’s how it goes. You can donate any amount but, for every $10.00 U.S. dollars you donate, you will be entered to win this one of a kind, hand engraved Harley-Davidson Derby Cover (a $250 dollar value)! No one else on earth will have this beautiful, hand crafted part! Every penny of proceeds will go toward Law Enforcement Charity of the winners choosing! You don’t have to ride to win. You don’t have to ride to enjoy the prize. The Winner may use the cover for whatever purpose you would like. Put it on display, give it to a LEO, gift it to someone who rides, it will be yours to decide!

    This cover fits all 99-14 Twin Cam Models (06 Dyna Glide and all 07-14 applications will require the use of gasket).

    The winner will be chosen at random  and announced on Saturday, January 10th. You must leave your name and contact information with your donation in order to win. The winner may choose the charity or cause the proceeds are relinquished to, with the exception that it is Law Enforcement specific.

    Don’t just like and share, give! click the link and throw a few bucks to the families of those who lost heroes!

    Peace, grease and a life of ease,

    ~Juggernaut



  • Featured Image No Reservations

    I like food, almost as much as I like motorcycles. I need both to live. With that being said, this is going to be a non-motorcycle related post. It’s going to be a biker-foodie on the road post.

    The scene has been set in my last few posts as to where the food presented here is coming from. One group of larder is from the ash of biker camp and the other hails in the deep south sin haven of New Orleans. I can’t quite decide which I prefered.

    Camp food is more worrisome. Where are you going to get it from? Is there a store near by? How primitive will my camp be? How far away from civilization will I be camping? Does this food require refrigeration? Where in the hell am I going to put a cooler on my bike?…. Well, you get the idea.

    We opted mostly for a few easy, non perishable items like can soup and hikers MRE’s for breakfast and lunch. We wanted to have quick easy options that required little prep and no refrigeration. We wanted to eat and be able to enjoy the day. The breakfast MRE’s sucked but that was to be expected. All that the MRE’s required was some warm water poured into the bag it came in and a spoon. Hell, if you’re a real caveman, the spoon is not really required either. To heat the water, we made a beer can stove out of an empty beer can and some first aid rubbing alcohol. (search it on youtube, its a pretty neat trick)

    For dinner we opted to ride a bit, crossing the miles long bridges over the ocean, and grab some grub and cold beers for the first few two nights. Some pizza and wings sufficed for the premier outing. The second evening, we introduced ourselves to Peg Leg Pete. Peg Leg Pete’s, it turned out, is a New Orleans themed parlor for a bit of unintentional forshadowing. We were escorted to our seats by some young dude/broad in granny jeans and our waiter spoke mush mouthed english. The food was good though.

    After two days in camp, we traveled to New Orleans and spent two nights livin’ the easy life. We then returned to camp for one more night to break up the 600 plus miles between NOLA, us and home. On our way into the last night in camp, we stopped to get potatoes, onions, a bag mixed with broccoli and carrots, some hamburger patties and brats. Everything but the brats were cut and mixed to place into some tin-foil to make the boy scout coined “silver turtles”. They are called silver turtles because it looks like a turtle shell when wrapped up. Beef in the middle, surrounded by the veggies and other fixin’s, wrapped tight and then just thrown on the coals. This creates a delicious, perfectly cooked full meal that tastes great.

    Camp food:

    New Orleans is a tourist city for those who don’t know. We expected tourist prices but, the actual price to just eat was unexpected. The first meal set the tone for every single item available in that town. An 8 inch “dressed” (mayo, tomato, lettuce etc in Big Easy-ese) da-bris pot-roast po-boy, a 6 ounce portion of gumbo and a 12oz. can root beer cost a whopping $22 at a hole in the wall not even on Bourbon Street. The cheapest t-shirt found in that city was $25. We opted to ease the pain on our wallets the second night and decided to find a liquor store and purchase a bottle of what we wanted. Rum. Even that was about $10 more than at home.

    The lavishly priced food was great for the most part, though, some was not the best I’ve had. If you going to be located in the heart of a city known for its food and, set the price to offset the cost of Katrina, it should all be fan-freakin-tastic! I tried one portion of everything NOLA is known for, gumbo, jambolaya, po-boy, red beans and rice, fried okra and even boiled crawfish (I’ll admit, I just tried a bite of the crawfish and wasn’t impressed). I was sad. I wanted to walk away with a new set of fesh swamp-laced tastebuds but, it wasn’t meant to be.

    I guess I will relate this posts to motorcycles a little bit. We were on the road, had miles to burn but still had to nourish our bodies with food. We ate mostly at gas stations like any other gypsy bike that had to be at a certain place, by a ceftain time and with sunlight to set up camp. It’s not pretty, it’s not the best and, it certainaly is not very nutricious. It does, however, get you fed and skims a ton of time. I guess you can say a diet of beef jerky, trail mix, gatorade and breakfast gut-buster burrito’s isn’t all that bad for you! If you have the time, eat whatever they hell you want.

     

    Peace, grease and a life of ease,

    ~Juggernaut



  • Featured Image NOLA

    Our two days of acting like giant sponges on the Gulf Coast of Florida was up. The guys and I awoke from our tents to find there was still a drizzle of rain. Just enough rain to have ourselves and our belongings soaked by the time we were ready to leave. We didn’t care. Just 215 miles or so from our little plot of island in Pensacola, Florida, lies a little town called New Orleans. We were roughly 4 hours from Bourbon Street and our “haunted” hotel rooms. I hope ghosts like hot showers.

    The rain subsided just as we crossed over the 4 mile bridge that allows us to ride from island to mainland. Cool, now we have all day to dry out. The miles were fast but boring as the only way to get there in any expedient time was on the stretch of black-top called the highway. Lord almighty, I hate the highway. 

    The road was not crowded thoughand didnt run through too many big cities. We were able to maintain an steady 80 mph pretty much the whole way. The highlights would have to be the huge bridges over water on I-10. There was a bridge near Mobile Alabama that had to be at least 8 miles long that ran dead into the George Wallace Tunnel. The tunnel runs about 40 feet beneath the Mobile River and is just over half a mile long. Oh, and a Harley sounds obnoxiously wonderful roaring through it!

    The other bridge is of course, the bridge over Lake Pontchartrain. The Lake Pontchartrain Causeway is listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the Longest Continuous Bridge Over Water. The longest portion of the bridge is just a hair under 24 miles long. It was awesome being surrounded by nothing but water for such a long span of time.

    Just outside of New Orleans, we stopped to activate the GPS in order to get us to the hotel. As soon as I made the decision to stop, I couldn’t find an off ramp to save my life! Mile after mile eased on and I pulled off at the first ramp I could find. Dead end. The only things at the end of this off ramp were; a small road off to the side that led to Lord knows where, a pile of old tires next to the woods and a half ton of used bullet shells right where we stopped. We were near New Orleans!!!

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    When we arrived at the over 200 year old hotel called the Andrew Jackson (pictured in the feature photo at the top of the post), we were greeted by Mrs. Cheryl. She set us up with our rooms and called the valet. The valet led us through the twists and turns of the randomly dilapidated/randomly refurbished buildings. He had led us to the locked and gated parking lot where our bikes would rest for the next two days. Gated and locked were the keys elements here and I didn’t worry much about my bike after I put on the fork lock, brake rotor lock and pulled my plug wires…

    Let the fun begin!

    bourbon, huge ass

    The first trouble we go in was after holding this stupid sign. The dudes the sign belonged to demanded a tip for letting us hold the sign that they offered to us. I don’t do demands. While Myles explained that to those fools, a crowd stated to form. Another joker who obviously doesn’t know me very well, walked up to about two inches away from me and started asking about my boots. “Nice boots. Bet I know where you got ’em. Bet I can tell you who your daddy is. If I tell you, will you be honest?” To which I responded. “No, I’m a damn liar but, I’ll tell you the truth about what will happen if you don’t step away from me..” By that time. The whole group of guys figured out we weren’t going to pay to play. The tone had changed and we were back on our way.

    New Orleans is everything they say it is only even sketchier and dirtier in real life. Do not stand around to think about what you want to do. If you stop, you have about 30 seconds before someone will approach you and want to talk about your damn shoes. I never did find out the punch line to “Bet I know where you got your shoes.” If you blew off the hecklers firm and quick, they move on right away. Some mumble a little shit talk as they go but, who cares.

     



  • Featured Image VooDoo Gypsy Tour

    The VooDoo Gypsy Tour is what I affectionately called the trip that myself and three other wayfaring brothers excursed. I have shared a few details of prepping for this journey here on this blog. (Just scroll the main page to find elements of what I packed as far as requisite tools to bring and items for a tolerable stay while on the road.)

    This post is just to show off the great time we had! We were on the road for 4 and a half days and ate up over 1,200 miles. Altogether we spent two nights in a small RV park on an island just off the coast of Pensacola beach Florida near Fort Pickens. It was beautiful there, too bad it rained the entire time! It didn’t matter, we were not at work and hanging with brothers. From the island, we headed off to New Orleans (more on ol’ NOLA in the next post). After two days in LA, we returned to the campground for a night of R&R before returning home.

    For the trek into Pensacola there were really no major issues. I was chastised by the mean ass subway lady for not wanting my roast beef sub toasted. She asked me three times and then when I said “no, I just want a regular damn roast beef sub”, she shot me a look as if she was about to pull the roast beef for my sub out of her pants… Once seated, the  old grungy dude in the overalls came over and announced we were dirty bikers. Twice… Screw your po-dunk subway!

    I’m sure you noticed the yellow shoes. We only allow David to wear the affectionately coined “Moo Shu Shoes” because he’s Asian and, quite frankly they are into weird things.

    Upon arrival at camp, we claimed our spots and hauled ass to get set up so we could eat. It started to rain almost immediately! Mother Nature didn’t stop crying until we were about to pack up to leave for New Orleans. Then, as soon as we packed up, it started raining. Oh well, we were heading for Bourbon Street!



  • Featured Image Travel Tools

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    So, your going to be traveling. Your a hundred miles from home and one of the bikes in your conga line breaks down. What did you bring to fix that sucker on the side of the road? AAA card? Or, did you come prepared to make a simple fix on the road? What did you bring?

    Once again, this is just my kit. Bring anything you believe may save your ass in a fix. Bring any items you may think are specific to your bike that you may have laying around. I always keep extra spare parts handy.

    Every bike on the road has nuts and bolts, wires and lights and a rider. You can do every bit of maintenance on time and even check the small things and still have a failure of some kind while on the road. At least pack the simple items that could fix those items that you know every motorcycle has.

    You don’t have to be a full on mechanic to do some simple fix that may get you running again. Anyone should be able to see a missing or loose bolt and tighten it. Anyone should be able to twist two wires together and wrap with electrical tape. Just don’t forget to disconnect the battery first…

    Aside from small tool kits with sockets and wrenches and adjustable wrenches what else might you need? Judging by the above pic, I probably carry too much or not enough.

    I have a fold up multi-tool with torx and hex extensions specific to H-D, needle nose pliers for crimping and getting into those hard to reach places, flat head and phillips screw driver, flashlight for night fixin’, shop rags, lighter, extra nuts and bolts specific to items that commonly rattle off, electrical tape and motorcycle jumper cables.

    But those are kinda obvious. What else may come in handy and is relatively small to carry?

    tools, wiring

    How about zip ties, a few extra inches of wire, wire connectors, fuses and wire posts? This fits in a small plastic baggy and could be invaluable for when a wire gets fried or falls and rubs on your rear tire.

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    I carry most of the small items shown in this small swing arm bag I mounted with zip ties. Its small, out of the way and barely noticeable. In fact, no one has ever seen it until I pointed it out.

    The wrench and socket kit are small but still too large to fit in the swing arm bag so I put them in my little saddle bag. On the other side of the bike.

    It’s kinda hard to see in the top pic but, under the electrical tape is a plastic baggy containing a couple of extra turn signal bulbs and an extra headlight. That wont stop you from getting home but, may keep you from getting a ticket or seeing at night.

    Think this is overkill? Not enough? What do you think is essential that I forgot? Any clever items that helped you along the way? Tell us about it in the comment section!

    Peace, grease and a life of ease,

    ~Juggernaut