• Tag Archives camping
  • Featured Image NOLA

    Our two days of acting like giant sponges on the Gulf Coast of Florida was up. The guys and I awoke from our tents to find there was still a drizzle of rain. Just enough rain to have ourselves and our belongings soaked by the time we were ready to leave. We didn’t care. Just 215 miles or so from our little plot of island in Pensacola, Florida, lies a little town called New Orleans. We were roughly 4 hours from Bourbon Street and our “haunted” hotel rooms. I hope ghosts like hot showers.

    The rain subsided just as we crossed over the 4 mile bridge that allows us to ride from island to mainland. Cool, now we have all day to dry out. The miles were fast but boring as the only way to get there in any expedient time was on the stretch of black-top called the highway. Lord almighty, I hate the highway. 

    The road was not crowded thoughand didnt run through too many big cities. We were able to maintain an steady 80 mph pretty much the whole way. The highlights would have to be the huge bridges over water on I-10. There was a bridge near Mobile Alabama that had to be at least 8 miles long that ran dead into the George Wallace Tunnel. The tunnel runs about 40 feet beneath the Mobile River and is just over half a mile long. Oh, and a Harley sounds obnoxiously wonderful roaring through it!

    The other bridge is of course, the bridge over Lake Pontchartrain. The Lake Pontchartrain Causeway is listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the Longest Continuous Bridge Over Water. The longest portion of the bridge is just a hair under 24 miles long. It was awesome being surrounded by nothing but water for such a long span of time.

    Just outside of New Orleans, we stopped to activate the GPS in order to get us to the hotel. As soon as I made the decision to stop, I couldn’t find an off ramp to save my life! Mile after mile eased on and I pulled off at the first ramp I could find. Dead end. The only things at the end of this off ramp were; a small road off to the side that led to Lord knows where, a pile of old tires next to the woods and a half ton of used bullet shells right where we stopped. We were near New Orleans!!!

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    When we arrived at the over 200 year old hotel called the Andrew Jackson (pictured in the feature photo at the top of the post), we were greeted by Mrs. Cheryl. She set us up with our rooms and called the valet. The valet led us through the twists and turns of the randomly dilapidated/randomly refurbished buildings. He had led us to the locked and gated parking lot where our bikes would rest for the next two days. Gated and locked were the keys elements here and I didn’t worry much about my bike after I put on the fork lock, brake rotor lock and pulled my plug wires…

    Let the fun begin!

    bourbon, huge ass

    The first trouble we go in was after holding this stupid sign. The dudes the sign belonged to demanded a tip for letting us hold the sign that they offered to us. I don’t do demands. While Myles explained that to those fools, a crowd stated to form. Another joker who obviously doesn’t know me very well, walked up to about two inches away from me and started asking about my boots. “Nice boots. Bet I know where you got ’em. Bet I can tell you who your daddy is. If I tell you, will you be honest?” To which I responded. “No, I’m a damn liar but, I’ll tell you the truth about what will happen if you don’t step away from me..” By that time. The whole group of guys figured out we weren’t going to pay to play. The tone had changed and we were back on our way.

    New Orleans is everything they say it is only even sketchier and dirtier in real life. Do not stand around to think about what you want to do. If you stop, you have about 30 seconds before someone will approach you and want to talk about your damn shoes. I never did find out the punch line to “Bet I know where you got your shoes.” If you blew off the hecklers firm and quick, they move on right away. Some mumble a little shit talk as they go but, who cares.

     



  • Featured Image VooDoo Gypsy Tour

    The VooDoo Gypsy Tour is what I affectionately called the trip that myself and three other wayfaring brothers excursed. I have shared a few details of prepping for this journey here on this blog. (Just scroll the main page to find elements of what I packed as far as requisite tools to bring and items for a tolerable stay while on the road.)

    This post is just to show off the great time we had! We were on the road for 4 and a half days and ate up over 1,200 miles. Altogether we spent two nights in a small RV park on an island just off the coast of Pensacola beach Florida near Fort Pickens. It was beautiful there, too bad it rained the entire time! It didn’t matter, we were not at work and hanging with brothers. From the island, we headed off to New Orleans (more on ol’ NOLA in the next post). After two days in LA, we returned to the campground for a night of R&R before returning home.

    For the trek into Pensacola there were really no major issues. I was chastised by the mean ass subway lady for not wanting my roast beef sub toasted. She asked me three times and then when I said “no, I just want a regular damn roast beef sub”, she shot me a look as if she was about to pull the roast beef for my sub out of her pants… Once seated, the  old grungy dude in the overalls came over and announced we were dirty bikers. Twice… Screw your po-dunk subway!

    I’m sure you noticed the yellow shoes. We only allow David to wear the affectionately coined “Moo Shu Shoes” because he’s Asian and, quite frankly they are into weird things.

    Upon arrival at camp, we claimed our spots and hauled ass to get set up so we could eat. It started to rain almost immediately! Mother Nature didn’t stop crying until we were about to pack up to leave for New Orleans. Then, as soon as we packed up, it started raining. Oh well, we were heading for Bourbon Street!



  • Featured Image Motorcycle Trippin’

    I read a few motorcycle related blogs and forums, I know, imagine that. But, what I often see on forums are questions about what to bring on a motorcycle venture.  I’m going to do my best to  address some of these questions from my own experience and opinion and bring some pics to the table for you hard learners to see.

    What these pics contain are just most of the stuff I brought. It’s not the ultimate collection, it’s not the mandatory collection. It’s just what I thought I might need. This post, I’m covering the what I need for every day life and comfort.

    To set the stage, I’ll begin by telling you a bit about the trip. Myself and 3 other guys left from Lawrenceville, Ga and traveled about 375 miles to a small island off the coast of Florida by Pensacola to an area called Fort Pickens. We spent two days at the campgrounds there and then packed up for 215 miles to New Orleans. We stayed in a hotel there that was over 200 years old! After two nights in NOLA, we went back to Fort Pickens for a night to break up the miles for the long road home.

    I wont address what clothes to bring. With all the handy tech., you should know the approximate weather and should know what you need for yourself in that area. Pack light and find clever ways to get your stuff cleaned if you have to. (we each bribed the hotel lady to run our stuff through the washer and dryer while in NOLA).

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    Here are some essentials just for everyday living. Of course, everything will need to be placed into something. Just for this trip, I got a motorcycle back pack at good ol’ Wally World for $35. It was inexpensive, slips over and secures to by back rest, and was a great buy. Sleeping bag, Bed Roll, lightweight small tent, soap, a bit of fist aid supplies, cooking pots. TP, flashlight, etc.

    Whats not shown is the small camp body towel I brought. It is kinda like a large sham-wow.. it did the job and was cheap. I also can not stress how much i use the every day, common, cheap and gangster cotton bandanna. I always have at least three of these things near by. I use them to cover my face and head, soak with water and wrap around my neck to cool me off, use as a soft wipe to get gas leaked on my gas tank during fill up, hand towel, wash cloth, etc. I use these things for all kinds of stuff.

    I made the mistake of thinking that I could get a cheap tent. I knew better but, figured that a tent would last a few uses and then I could throw it away if I had to and not care too much. Well, the tent leaked, and it rained… A LOT! Don’t be a cheapskate in this area. You just may come out of your trip looking like a prune. In fact, just stay away from anything made by Ozark Trail…

    You can however, use whatever cheap bedding that is appropriate for the weather and fits safely with your travel pack. A lot of folks can be seen of using the classic Mexican blanket (shown top left). One night I just used my denim jacket and was fine. The small blue bag labeled “cocoon” sitting beside the flashlight is an REI product. It’s an over-priced but awesome inflatable pillow. It cost about $30 (which was as much as my crappy tent) but, was completely worth it!

    I brought some small cooking pots that uses several pots and a cup that can be stored all within itself. This is a common camping item and can be found anywhere. To the right of the cooking pot you can see a bag full of tin foil. I used every bit of that tin foil for cooking. Very easy to use to prep food on, wrap food up, and throw it in the fire to cook then throw away. I’ve always called this a “silver turtle” because of the way it looks.

    food, silver turtle

    The “silver turtle” pulled out of the fire. Once rolled up with the food inside, just throw this sucker directly on the camp fire coals.

    food, turtle inside

     

    Inside the turtle, you have potatoes, onions, carrots, broccoli and a hamburger patty all cooked and steamed inside together! Damn good!

    Other essential items that you may not think of are: trash bags (waterproofing, carrying items, make-shift rain gear, over the head suffocation device, etc), toilet paper, rope (clotheslines, tarp hanging, equipment securing and securing annoying drunk campers…) flashlight, snacks, soap and a first aid kit. My first aid kit consisted of stuff I had around the house just placed into a plastic baggy. That is what I do for a lot of things. If you already have the items, just stick them in a bag to make your own kit. Screw wasting money on over priced first aid kits containing just band aids and alcohol swabs. Hell, just a bunch of plastic baggies came in handy on this trip.

    pack

    Make sure everything packs up secure and then waterproof!

    pack, rainproof

    During each trip you will refine the gear you bring. Some items may work and others not. You may find a need for something that I don’t need. What is your essential to pack “every day life and comfort” items?

    Next post, I’ll cover tools and emergency items to keep your bike on the road.

    Feel free to post your opinions in the comment section. What do you bring? What did I miss?

    Peace, grease and a life of ease,

    ~Juggernaut