• Tag Archives Harley-Davidson
  • Featured Image What Tools Do You Carry to Get You Home?

    As I was riding home today, I passed another rider who was no longer being powered by an engine. He was hoofing it and pushing the bike in the middle of the road trying to get it the last couple feet and into the gas station. I turned around and met him at the pumps. After our brief intros, I asked him if he was simply out of gas or was there another problem? He hoped it was just the gas but, after filling up, there was still no start.

    I keep a small bag of tools and an even smaller bag of expertise on me at all times while on the bike. I looked and listened and with a small adjustment, my new friend’s bike fired right up and he was able to get home! I fired my monster up and took off the barely one mile to my own house. As soon as I turned into the “hood”, my bike just simply shut off. I played with the ignition as I coasted as far as I could and not a thing lit up. Of course I came to a stop at the one house with the shirtless teen playing basketball and listening to rap music. I was burning up in my leather jacket but, gladly pushed my denim black burden a few houses down to begin assessing the issues.

    It turned out that one of my battery terminals had rattled loose.. again… I’d have been pushing that 900 pound bike the half mile to my house had I not had a few simple tools.

    I keep the tools stashed in a small bag I put on the swingarm. It’s a great spot. Out of the way and no one notices it, which helps keep me satisfied that no one will find it and want to explore the contents.

    Secret Tool Bag

    Inside I keep at least a few tools that might help me get home. I have a phillips and flat head screw driver, a wrench that fits the rear wheel belt sprocket bolts that have a tendency to come loose, two adjustable wrenches so I can adjust lock bolts such as on the clutch cable and a Harley specific multi-tool. I also keep extra items to help myself like the shop rag and flashlight. I also always carry at least one extra lighter and a small knife.

    For a long time I kept no saddle bags or any way of holding extra stuff on my bike. After some time and a ton of miles later, a bag of some sort for ease of carrying at least a few extra items was necessary. I purchased a small, hand-made leather saddle bag that was specifically designed to be low profile. Inside I keep a mini socket and wrench set, motorcycle jumper cables, a few wire connectors, a super mini multi-tool and some electrical tape. Almost all of these items have helped me in some kind of way on the road.

    Tools

    Of course, there will always be some fixes that will not be able to be repaired on the road but, shouldn’t you be prepared for the ones you can? What items do you carry that have helped you on the way?

    Peace, Grease and a Life of Ease,

    ~Juggernaut



  • Featured Image Juggernaut Cycles is in Full Swing!

    We are learning all the time about how we are saving customers money on all their motorcycle needs! Quality service and craftsmanship is a must but, knowing we can do it for a better price is satisfying. We can get all the parts and accessories any other shop can get but, we can get them for any style ride you have! We service all makes and models. We specialize in big twin, Harley style and similar bikes but, we also service your sport bikes and others. Just call and ask. We have full catalogs from all the major suppliers as well for all your accessory and customization needs! Stop by the shop!

    We can also help you with customizing in a more personal way. We can paint helmets and Powder Coat parts. We offer Hand Engraving on certain parts and also Custom Leather of all types: Wallets, Bed rolls, Seats and more! Click the links on the right to choose the category your looking for to see more examples of past work.

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    We are also hosting a motorcycle show this Saturday, May, 2nd! We will be taking over the City of Auburn city hall and showing off all kinds of bikes! You can win prizes and more! There will be a motorcycle ride, Beer tent, and a BBQ contest with samples. As well as a live band and plenty more as well!

    MOTORCYCLE SHOW FLYER JPG

    Don’t forget BIKE NIGHT! Every Thursday! Free hotdogs, biker games and comradery!

    Make sure to stop by!

    120 Auburn Park Drive,

    Suite G

    Auburn, GA 30011

    or call,

    404-551-6608

    Peace, Grease and a Life of Ease,

    ~Juggernaut



  • Featured Image How Custom is Your Bike Without Custom Engraving?

    Check out the latest. I will have these designs for the Bike Nights and the Wingmen MC swap meet at the end of the month. Then, I will put them up for sale on the website. These are all designs that I thought customers may like and decided to have some on hand for people to see in person. These are all done by hand, in shop and I can do just about whatever you would like on all kinds of different engravable parts for many different motorcycles. If you have something you want engraved, hit me up and we will see if we can make it happen!

    Peace Grease and a Life of Ease,

    ~Juggernaut



  • Featured Image Greasy Dozen Build Update

    I’ve been working long and hard getting a few items finished for the shop so customers can see all that we have to offer. In the meantime, I have done a few things for the Greasy Dozen Build and I’m working on some bigger items to share. When I have the items complete, I will post them as a start to finish.

    I started work on the OEM transmission. Before I started tearing this thing apart, I noticed a hitch in the kicker. Every few kicks the kicker arm would slip. I will be tearing into it to fix whatever issue that is and to install some heavier duty kicker elements so my fat ass doesn’t break it in the future.

    I started with hand polishing the original cast cases to see what I could do. I think it came out awesome! I started with wet to dry sandpaper. Went from 350 and didn’t miss a step from there to 5,000 grit. Next comes polish and a sealant. Painstaking work that isn’t quick. But, the end result is satisfying and beautiful!

    1 trans start 2 beginning 3 mid way 4 75 percent 5 transmission fiished

    The next step was getting some other OEM parts cleaned and powder coated. Check out the battery box before and after. Also, in the last photo you will see a few other parts like my custom fender struts and clutch arm and a few other pieces. All done with help from one of my best friends Allen from VSM. He did a fantastic job.

    1 OEM 2 Bead blast 3 Powdered

    More work to come. Heads and rocker boxes are being worked on, battery box being engraved and more than I care to think about…

    Peace, Grease and a Life of Ease,

    ~Juggernaut



  • Featured Image Engraving Parts for the Greasy Dozen Build

    It’s been a cold month and the shop is pretty slow. I have been knocking out a bunch of stuff for the Greasy Dozen build that is kinda tedious and takes some time. I want to get these small details done while I have the time.

    I engraved the inspection cover and was able to achieve the “brushed” look I was going for. I used a diamond encrusted bit and went light and slow. There are other ways to do this of course, like with vinyl cut-outs and sand blasting among others. The way, I’ve done it, I feel I was more involved as I personally put each mark on the metal myself.

    The derby cover is just something I found and altered a bit to suit my needs and engraved it on. Its not completely finished as I want to do something to adorn the edges and use up some of the empty space.

    The Raw Piece Finished installed Up Close Inspection/Derby

    I finally have the front head off and can now also start rebuilding the top end! Yeah, whoever built them last glued them down… yes, glued…

    A few more small details to engrave and then polishing the cases by hand. Then ready for the rebuild!

    Peace, Grease and A Life of Ease,

    ~Juggernaut



  • Featured Image How To Admit A Momentary Defeat

    I have to admit, this damn bike has got me angry today!! I am at the point that I need to remove the heads and rocker boxes. I am going to polish the rocker boxes by hand then take the heads to my buddies shop and walnut blast them. There is one hell of a problem though…. I cant get the friggin’ heads off!!! Those suckers are on there and won’t budge and inch! Never had this problem before. I quadruple checked the all the bolts to ensure I removed them. I took a razor along the edge to remove any gunk or build up. I made sure the piston was in the lowest position and even tried it in multiple positions. I applied heat and lots of it! The front head didn’t budge!  In the mean time, I did a few other small details but, this is the last major thing I need to do before I start the rebuild. Damn I want this done! Hopefully, I will get to be a Greasy Dozen Builder and make this bike a beautiful addition to the vast array of awesome builds already done. Even if I don’t make it in the Greasy Dozen, I will still chronicle the build here on the blog. I’ll be doing a top end rebuild once the damn heads come off. I’m making some fender struts, chopping a rear fender, removing the front fender, new gas tank, 12 inch “Z” bars with the switches integrated right into the bars. The engine is beefed up with an S&S 93inch kit and it has a clutch basket to handle the torque. I’ll stick some old school style Firestone or Avon tires on it and polish every damn spoke on the rims. Of course there is plenty more but, I’m done with it today. Check back to see progress or, stop by the new shop and see it yourself!

    Shovel-it
    Somethings gotta give!

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  • Featured Image Greasy New Shop

    Well, I’ve updated everything else so I may as well update my own webpage. Along with the fact that I will be moving into an actual shop next week, the possibility of being a Greasy Dozen builder has got me motivated! I’m going to have to stall on the build for a week or two because I’ll be in the process of moving but I’ve got a couple of cool shots of the chop to share! Keep your fingers crossed for my on the Greasy Dozen and make sure you stop by the shop after next weekend to say hello and look around!

    The shop will be located at 120 Auburn Park Drive, Suite G, Auburn GA 30011. It will still be a bit part time so the hours will have to contend with my other full time job. As of right now I will be open Tues. and Wed. from 9am-noon and Thurs., Fri., and Sat. from 10am-7pm!

    See you in the new shop!

    Peace, Grease and a life of Ease,

    ~Juggernaut



  • Featured Image H-D St. Bob Ignition Relocation; What Should Have Been, Part 2

    Yes, there are ways to do this. There are pluses and minuses to every method. The method shown keeps the original ignition/fork lock on the neck in place and maintains the fork lock function the way it always was. The downside is this will require a separate key that turns on your new ignition.  Some, get the new ignition made keyed to match the original so both the neck, fork lock and ignition use only one key. This lets you avoid having to carry two small, different keys in your pocket.  There are also full kits to order and you get all the components together at one time and ready for installation.

    Some variances of installation will still require you have to have the specifically made tool to remove the actual ignition and, a new key position indicator washer thing because most get messed up during removal. And, like I said in Part 1, some folks just order new dash panels for Wide Glide models with the ignition point already installed. The list could go on and on.  Go whichever route you would like. The option I’m describing requires little, if any, extra effort compared to all those other options. The best part is the cost is significantly less. Period. Do the research and figure which option suits your wallet. I’ll be just fine and comfortable carrying one tiny key for ignition and one for the fork locks.

    If you are going the same route as me, there are other ways to mount the ignition to the dash as well. Some show they drilled the bolt holes right through the top of the dash and mount it directly onto the dash itself. A lot of others have been seen doing it similar to what I’m doing here, creating a mounting plate to use as a stand for the ignition. To be honest, bolting the ignition right onto the dash would have been easier but, also will create 4 more holes to seal against water and would have the top of the bolts visible right on the dash. If you’re cool with looking at four bolts around your ignition and want an easy assembly, by all means, go that route.

    Pickin’ up right where we left off;

    9 template10 pattern trace

    The next step is to take a sheet of paper and your dirty hands. Set the paper on top of the mounting area and press down, making an exact outline of your mounting surface. Make sure to press down where all the bolt holes are. Take your template and cut it out, set it on your aluminum, mark it and cut it all out. I used a drill for the bolt holes and put a bit of electrical tape around the outer edge to protect against sharp edges.

    11 mock up

    Once it’s all cut out, set it all up for mock-up.

    12 prep for placement13 Mock up stand

    Place some two sided or rolled up masking tape on the aluminum ignition plate you made. Put the dash back on in the correct position while holding the ignition unit in the cut out ignition hole. Once everything is in place, set the ignition unit down on top of the masking tape. It’s now in position for you to mark the holes for the ignition unit. Drill the holes out and mock up the new ignition stand using the bolts and screws etc. as shown in the pic.

    14 Lengthen Wires

    Mock up everything again to ensure proper placement of the new ignition set up and start making measurements of how much wire you will need to add to the ignition wires. Don’t add too much extra wire because it will get crowded and messy under the dash real quick.

    15 Fitment

    Make sure to get the wires lined up correctly to the correct posts of course. Then solder the wires back together.  Do the heat shrink and wrap thing and you may need some extra electrical tape and/or tiny zip ties to hold the wires together neatly. Or, be a slob if your into that sorta thing, I don’t care…

    8 Grommet16 Dielectric

    Place in the grommet, add some dielectric grease to the end of the ignition and stick it all back together.

    18 Finished

    Check to make sure it works!

    19 check

    If you have any questions on anything just let me know or leave a comment and someone may chime in to help offer you a solution. This is a must-do mod for St. Bob owners. This is how things should have been from the start!

    Peace, Grease and a Life of Ease,

    ~Juggernaut



  • Featured Image Greasy Dozen Builder Entry

    In the process of getting this burden entered into the Greasy Dozen Builder Initiative! Found out about this last year when I was just a bit too late to enter. Been waiting and excited to enter a build ever since. The Greasy Dozen is 12 bikes in three categories chosen among home builders or shops consisting of no more than two employees. You post updates and showcase your build on instagram and www.chopcult.com. It is run by chopcult and www.oldbikebarn.com and has a ton of awesome sponsors;

    www.Biltwell.com @biltwell
    www.Burlybrand.com burlybrand
    www.chopcult.com @chopcult
    www.Feltraiger.com @feltraigr
    www.indianlarrymotorcycles.com @indianlarrymotorcycles
    www.KickstartCycle.com @kickstartcycle
    www.kundratickustoms.com/ @kundratickutoms
    www.ledsledscustoms.com @ledsledcustoms
    www.LowbrowCustoms.com @lowbrowcustoms
    www.lowsidesyn.com/ @lowside_magazine
    www.mooresensible.com/
    www.digthelid.com/ @oldschoolhelmets
    www.oldbikbarn.com @oldbikebarn
    www.Rockandride.com @rockanride
    www.showclassmag.com/ @show_class_mag
    http://www.speeddealercustoms.com/ @speeddealer
    www.Spitfiremotorcycles.com: @spitfiremotorcycles
    www.tcbros.com @tcbroschoppers
    www.triplesixcrewdeathco.com @triplesixcrewdeathcompany
    www.paisanopub.com/wrench/ @wrenchmagazine

    I’m throwing one of my shovel builds out there for this. I’ll be entering my 1980 Shovelhead FXE. It is currently a bit of a mess since I am removing and draining all oil lines and in the process of removing the rocker boxes for hand polish. It has S&S 93″ cylinders and will be kick start only. It has matching numbers on the frame and engine so I’m keeping the frame and motor together although I’ll have to chop some stuff off the frame. I’ll also be keeping the front forks and sticking with the swingarm. Everything else will go. I’ll be doing the custom leather seat and hand engraved parts myself. I’m rebuilding the engine and doing a complete rewire because I’m getting rid of every other part and adding my own.

     



  • Featured Image H-D St. Bob Ignition Relocation, What Should Have Been; Part 1

    Anyone who has a Harley-Davidson Dyna St. Bob like my ’07, knows the pain in the ass it is to turn that sucker on! Yeah, it’s kinda nostalgic to have the ignition on the neck but, it soon gets tiring. Most Harley models have an  ignition on the top of the gas tank, on the dash portion. It’s nice, you can put in the key, turn it on, take the key out and have access to turn your hog on right in front of you and in hands reach. Basically its key-less from there unless you want to lock it.

    The St. Bob though, has the ignition is on the neck. This involves turning the bike on before you get on and you leave the key dangling from the ignition. Its a bit hard to fumble with the key when you have thick winter gloves on. And, you have to get off the bike to turn it off or lean over the tank and hope your jacket doesn’t scratch it in the process. I’d always hit the kill switch on the handlebar, get off the bike and take off my gloves, glasses, helmet etc and then forget the damn ignition. Even after riding this thing daily and for thousands of miles. For my birthday this year, all I wanted was a new ignition.

    If you are confident enough in your skills to locate the ignition wires (always have a manual for your model), cut and solder wire and cut through the dash on your expensive two wheeled mistress, then, this mod is for you. If you can’t confidently locate and solder a wire or, would simply not like to mess with it, you can always bring to the shop and let me do it for you!

    If your game to get it done, here is a picture tutorial on how I accomplished mine:

    A couple tools used:

    Metal snips, 2 inch diameter hole drill bit, 4 flat bottom screws and 12 nuts with 4 lock washers, a few inches of extra wire, wire heat shrink, a piece of paper for a template and a small sheet of aluminum. I used electrical tape and a few zip ties to keep the wires together and neat. I ordered my new black ignition from ebay.

    5 tools needed

     

    First, disconnect your battery then start taking your dash all the way apart. Basically disconnect every wire and take out the little neutral light indicator. It’s easy and pretty self explanatory.

    1 dash disasemble

    From there, you are going to have to pull the little plastic wire protector/deflector out to gain complete access to the ignition wires. You may have to loosen up your fuel tank to get your hand in there. The deflector is located under the gas tank, on the bottom of the frame backbone, on top of the front cylinder, by the bike’s neck….(didn’t get a pic, sorry) Anyway, once its removed you can pull most of the wires out from there, you may have to pull other wires out of the neck from the inserts on the neck by the ignition. Getting the wires out and back in are really the hardest part of this whole ordeal.

    2 wires pulled out

    Now, you will have to get your big fat hand inside the neck from the bottom, where you pulled out the plastic protector insert. The ignition wires are mounted onto the left side of the inner neck wall. It has a little tab they may hold it in place but, mine came out easy with a light tug.

    3 wire location 4 wire located

     

    Get the ignition wires pulled out and routed through the left side wire insert area on the neck. You will see the other sets of wires leading to the dash of your bike coming out of there. Your going to have to add some length to the wires in order to make this work.

    Before we add wire, we need something to measure and mock up to. So, get ready to cut your dash. I have seen others that mentioned that they purchased a dash for a Wide Glide and just hooked it all up to that. That is a couple hundred bucks I’m not going to spend when I can just cut a hole and insert a rubber grommet.

    There are three random raised lines in the center of your dash under the neutral indicator light bar. Find the center of the center line and mark it as your pilot hole spot. Take your 2 inch diameter hole drill bit and drill it out!

    6 Find the center 7 Cut hole

    I used a Dremel to sand down the sharp edges then put some electrical tape around the edge so not to scratch up my ignition during mock up because the rubber grommet had not arrived yet. I ordered a grommet from www.cableorganizer.com. I could not find one ANYWHERE! So, I picked out exactly what I needed online and had it delivered to my door. Cost about 5 bucks delivered. Make sure you order the grommet at 2 inches total diameter. Not 2′ inner diameter or the outside diameter will be too big. I used a 1/8 grommet width.

    8 Grommet

    This will keep you busy for a minute, check back for part two in just a few days.

    Peace, Grease and a Life of Ease,

    ~Juggernaut