• Tag Archives mechanical
  • Featured Image What Tools Do You Carry to Get You Home?

    As I was riding home today, I passed another rider who was no longer being powered by an engine. He was hoofing it and pushing the bike in the middle of the road trying to get it the last couple feet and into the gas station. I turned around and met him at the pumps. After our brief intros, I asked him if he was simply out of gas or was there another problem? He hoped it was just the gas but, after filling up, there was still no start.

    I keep a small bag of tools and an even smaller bag of expertise on me at all times while on the bike. I looked and listened and with a small adjustment, my new friend’s bike fired right up and he was able to get home! I fired my monster up and took off the barely one mile to my own house. As soon as I turned into the “hood”, my bike just simply shut off. I played with the ignition as I coasted as far as I could and not a thing lit up. Of course I came to a stop at the one house with the shirtless teen playing basketball and listening to rap music. I was burning up in my leather jacket but, gladly pushed my denim black burden a few houses down to begin assessing the issues.

    It turned out that one of my battery terminals had rattled loose.. again… I’d have been pushing that 900 pound bike the half mile to my house had I not had a few simple tools.

    I keep the tools stashed in a small bag I put on the swingarm. It’s a great spot. Out of the way and no one notices it, which helps keep me satisfied that no one will find it and want to explore the contents.

    Secret Tool Bag

    Inside I keep at least a few tools that might help me get home. I have a phillips and flat head screw driver, a wrench that fits the rear wheel belt sprocket bolts that have a tendency to come loose, two adjustable wrenches so I can adjust lock bolts such as on the clutch cable and a Harley specific multi-tool. I also keep extra items to help myself like the shop rag and flashlight. I also always carry at least one extra lighter and a small knife.

    For a long time I kept no saddle bags or any way of holding extra stuff on my bike. After some time and a ton of miles later, a bag of some sort for ease of carrying at least a few extra items was necessary. I purchased a small, hand-made leather saddle bag that was specifically designed to be low profile. Inside I keep a mini socket and wrench set, motorcycle jumper cables, a few wire connectors, a super mini multi-tool and some electrical tape. Almost all of these items have helped me in some kind of way on the road.

    Tools

    Of course, there will always be some fixes that will not be able to be repaired on the road but, shouldn’t you be prepared for the ones you can? What items do you carry that have helped you on the way?

    Peace, Grease and a Life of Ease,

    ~Juggernaut



  • Featured Image H-D St. Bob Ignition Relocation; What Should Have Been, Part 2

    Yes, there are ways to do this. There are pluses and minuses to every method. The method shown keeps the original ignition/fork lock on the neck in place and maintains the fork lock function the way it always was. The downside is this will require a separate key that turns on your new ignition.  Some, get the new ignition made keyed to match the original so both the neck, fork lock and ignition use only one key. This lets you avoid having to carry two small, different keys in your pocket.  There are also full kits to order and you get all the components together at one time and ready for installation.

    Some variances of installation will still require you have to have the specifically made tool to remove the actual ignition and, a new key position indicator washer thing because most get messed up during removal. And, like I said in Part 1, some folks just order new dash panels for Wide Glide models with the ignition point already installed. The list could go on and on.  Go whichever route you would like. The option I’m describing requires little, if any, extra effort compared to all those other options. The best part is the cost is significantly less. Period. Do the research and figure which option suits your wallet. I’ll be just fine and comfortable carrying one tiny key for ignition and one for the fork locks.

    If you are going the same route as me, there are other ways to mount the ignition to the dash as well. Some show they drilled the bolt holes right through the top of the dash and mount it directly onto the dash itself. A lot of others have been seen doing it similar to what I’m doing here, creating a mounting plate to use as a stand for the ignition. To be honest, bolting the ignition right onto the dash would have been easier but, also will create 4 more holes to seal against water and would have the top of the bolts visible right on the dash. If you’re cool with looking at four bolts around your ignition and want an easy assembly, by all means, go that route.

    Pickin’ up right where we left off;

    9 template10 pattern trace

    The next step is to take a sheet of paper and your dirty hands. Set the paper on top of the mounting area and press down, making an exact outline of your mounting surface. Make sure to press down where all the bolt holes are. Take your template and cut it out, set it on your aluminum, mark it and cut it all out. I used a drill for the bolt holes and put a bit of electrical tape around the outer edge to protect against sharp edges.

    11 mock up

    Once it’s all cut out, set it all up for mock-up.

    12 prep for placement13 Mock up stand

    Place some two sided or rolled up masking tape on the aluminum ignition plate you made. Put the dash back on in the correct position while holding the ignition unit in the cut out ignition hole. Once everything is in place, set the ignition unit down on top of the masking tape. It’s now in position for you to mark the holes for the ignition unit. Drill the holes out and mock up the new ignition stand using the bolts and screws etc. as shown in the pic.

    14 Lengthen Wires

    Mock up everything again to ensure proper placement of the new ignition set up and start making measurements of how much wire you will need to add to the ignition wires. Don’t add too much extra wire because it will get crowded and messy under the dash real quick.

    15 Fitment

    Make sure to get the wires lined up correctly to the correct posts of course. Then solder the wires back together.  Do the heat shrink and wrap thing and you may need some extra electrical tape and/or tiny zip ties to hold the wires together neatly. Or, be a slob if your into that sorta thing, I don’t care…

    8 Grommet16 Dielectric

    Place in the grommet, add some dielectric grease to the end of the ignition and stick it all back together.

    18 Finished

    Check to make sure it works!

    19 check

    If you have any questions on anything just let me know or leave a comment and someone may chime in to help offer you a solution. This is a must-do mod for St. Bob owners. This is how things should have been from the start!

    Peace, Grease and a Life of Ease,

    ~Juggernaut



  • Featured Image GA clay Intruder

    A loyal customer always brings me his bikes but, they are always in a crazy state of disrepair! Guess he doesnt bring me the bikes often enough… The current culprit is an ’01 Suzuki Intruder. This project needed some pics.

    I’ll start off by showing a weird phenomenon with this clients bikes. Same owner, two different bikes. The first pic with the green algae looking stuff is on a V Max. The next pic, with the Georgia clay looking stuff is the current bike, the intruder.

    101_0550

    bruce bike 7

    Now that we have set the base line. Here is the rest of the bike.

    bruce bike 5

    bruce bike 6

    bruce bike 2

    bruce bike 8

    It’s worn down and missing a few parts and bolts but, it runs right?

    The part that I am doing is fixing the hydraulic clutch master cylinder. Some of the rubber parts have degraded over time and the whole unit needs to be replaced. Then, maybe we wont have any more dirt in the unit!

    bruce bike 4

    behind this ugly thing is leaking like a sieve.

    bruce bike

    bruce bike 3

    Out with the old and in with the new. Now to convince him that he cant ride home on that rear tire…

    Peace, grease and a life of ease…

    ~Juggernaut